Water Quality Advisory Updated May 20, 2020: Here's what residents should know.

 The Board of Directors will consider adopting Resolution No. 2020-08 at its regular meeting on July 15, 2020 to establish the appropriation limit of the District at $1,715,768.00 for Fiscal Year 2020-2021. View Public Notice and Board Resolution

 

Paradise Irrigation District has taken thousands of regulated and unregulated water samples during the past years to determine the presence of any radioactive, biological, inorganic, volatile and synthetic organic contaminants and monitor the treatment process. The tables below show only those contaminants that were detected in the water; some that were not detected are listed because our customers may be interested in seeing the results. The State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) requires us to monitor for certain substances less than once per year because the concentrations of these substances do not change significantly. In these cases, the most recent sample data are included, along with the year in which the sample was taken.

 

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PRIMARY HEALTH STANDARDS

Surface Water Supply Groundwater Supply  

SUBSTANCE
(UNIT OF MEASURE)

MCL

YEAR

SAMPLED

AVERAGE
DETECTED

RANGE
LOW-HIGH

YEAR
SAMPLED

AVERAGE
DETECTED

RANGE
LOW-HIGH

MAJOR SOURCE IN DRINKING WATER

INORGANIC
Chromium (Total)
(ppb)
50 2013 ND ND 2014 3.4 3.4 Erosion of natural deposits.
Hexavalent Chromium
(ppb)
None 2015 0.11 0.11 2014 2.5 2.5 Erosion of natural deposits.
CLARITY
Turbidity (NTU)
(prior to treatment)
~ 2019 1.28 0.35-12.78 2016 0.18 0.18 Soil runoff.
Turbidity (NTU) (TT)
(treated water)
0.2 2019 0.04 0.04-0.05 NA NA NA Soil runoff.

 

Turbidity is a measurement of the cloudiness of the water. Turbidity measurement is a good indicator of the effectiveness of the filtration system. PID’s permit with State Drinking Division requires PID to deliver water with no more than 0.2 NTU.

 

RADIOLOGICAL
Radium 228 (pCi/L) 5 2017 2.2 2.2 2017 2.9 2.9 Erosion of natural deposits.
DISINFECTANT
Chlorine, Free Residual as Cl2
(ppm) (TT)
4 2019 0.95 0.43-1.44 NA NA NA Water additive used to control microbes.
DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCTS
Bromodichlorometh-
ane
(ppb)
~ 2019 2 2-3 NA NA NA Drinking water disinfection.
Bromoform (ppb) ~ 2019 7 6-7 NA NA NA Drinking water disinfection.
Chloroform (Trichloromethane) (ppb) ~ 2019 30 21-40 NA NA NA Drinking water disinfection.
Dibromochloromethane (ppb) ~ 2019 2 2 NA NA NA Drinking water disinfection.
Trihalomethanes, Total (ppb) 80 2019 34 23-43 NA NA NA Drinking water disinfection.
Dichloroacetic Acid (DCAA) (ppb) ~ 2019 14 7-21 NA NA NA Drinking water disinfection.
Trichloroacetic Acid (TCAA) (ppb) ~ 2019 19 13-24 NA NA NA Drinking water disinfection.
Bromoaceticacid (ppb) ~ 2019 3 3 NA NA NA Drinking water disinfection.
Haloacetic Acids, Total (ppb) 60 2019 33 26-43 NA NA NA Drinking water disinfection.
DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCT PRECURSOR
Total Organic Carbon
(prior to treatment)
~ 2019 1.1 0.8-1.4 NA NA NA Decay of natural organic matter.

 

UNREGULATED AND OTHER SUBSTANCES

Surface Water Supply Groundwater Supply  

CHEMICAL
(UNIT OF MEASURE)

YEAR SAMPLED

AVERAGE DETECTED

RANGE 
LOW-HIGH

YEAR SAMPLED

AVERAGE DETECTED

RANGE 
LOW-HIGH

MAJOR SOURCE IN DRINKING WATER

Alkalinity as CaC03 (ppm) 2019 31 26-39 2014 81 81 Natural occurring substance.
Bicarbonate Alkalinity (ppm) 2017 29 29 2014 99 99 Natural occurring substance.
Calcium (ppm) 2017 4.5 4.5 2014 15 15 Natural occurring substance.
Magnesium (ppm) 2017 3.3 3.3 2014 9.3 9.3 Natural occurring substance.
Sodium (ppm) 2011 1.7 1.7 2014 5.1 5.1 Natural occurring substance.
Chlorate (ppb) 2015 260 120-400 NA NA NA Sodium Hypochlorite used for disinfection.
pH 2019 7.1 7.0-7.2 2017 7.3 7.3 Slightly basic water.

  

SECONDARY AESTHETIC STANDARDS

Surface Water Supply Groundwater Supply  

CHEMICAL (UNIT OF MEASURE)

MCL

YEAR SAMPLED

AVERAGE DETECTED

RANGE
LOW-HIGH

YEAR SAMPLED

AVERAGE DETECTED

RANGE
LOW-HIGH

MAJOR SOURCE IN DRINKING WATER

Chloride (ppm) 500 2011 2.5 2.5 2014 1.3 1.3 Natural occurring substance.
Hardness (ppm) ~ 2016 28 28 2014 76 76 Naturally occurring substance.
Total Dissolved Solids (ppm) 500 2016 43 43 2014 150 150 Naturally occurring substance.
CORROSIVITY
Specific Conductance (uS/cm) 1600 2016 77 77 2014 160 160 A measurement of water's conductance.
Langelier Saturation Index * Non-Corrosive 2016 -1.7 -1.7 NA NA NA Indicator of corrosiveness of water.
Aggressive Index Non-Corrosive 2016 10 10 NA NA NA Indicator of corrosiveness in water.
Zinc (ppm)(TT) 5 2017 0.39 0.29-0.56 2014 NA NA Water additive used to control corrosion.
Orthophosphate (ppm) (TT) ~ 2017 1.11 0.92-1.41 NA NA NA Water additive used to control corrosion.

 

* The Langelier Saturation and Aggressive Indices and Specific Conductance are tests to measure the corrosivity of water. The results indicate that PID water is mildly corrosive. Zinc orthophosphate (ZOP) is added at the treatment plant to reduce the corrosiveness of the water on metallic pipes.

 Flouride is not added to the District's drinking water; fluoride concentration in the raw water is not detectable.

LEAD AND COPPER ANALYSIS

Every three years PID is required to sample at the customers’ faucets for lead and copper. This monitoring ensures our water is not too corrosive and does not leach unsafe levels of these metals into your drinking water. Compliance measurements are from the 90th percentile (the level measured at 90% of homes sampled). See “Corrosivity” section.

 

SUBSTANCE (UNIT OF MEASURE)   YEAR      SAMPLED  VIOLATION?  AL  PHG  (MCLG) AMOUNT
DETECTED (90th%TILE)
SCHOOLS REQUESTING SAMPLING SITES ABOVE AL/TOTAL SITES TYPICAL SOURCE
Copper (ppm at the 90th percentile) 2017 No 1.3 0.3 0.01 0 0/30 Internal corrosion of household plumbing.
Lead (ppb at the 90th percentile) 2017 No 15 0.2 ND 0 0/30 Internal corrosion of household plumbing.


 TOTAL COLIFORM AND E.COLI SAMPLING IN 2019

MICROBIOLOGICAL
CONTAMINANTS
(AND REPORTING UNITS)

HIGHEST
NUMBER
DETECTED

# MONTHS IN
VIOLATION
MCL IN
COMPLIANCE?
MAJOR SOURCE IN DRINKING WATER
 Total Coliform 0 0 1 sample Yes Naturally present in environment.
Fecal Coliform or E.coli
(State Total Coliform rule)
0 0 A routine sample and a repeat sample are total coliform positive, and one of these is also fecal coliform or E.coli positive. Yes

Human and animal fecal waste.

Fecal Coliform or E.coli
(Federal Revised Total Coliform rule)
0 0 Routine and repeat samples are total coliform-positive and either is E.coli or system fails to take repeat samples following E.coli positive routine sample or system fails to analyze total coliform-positive repeat sample for E.coli Yes human and animal fecal waste.

 

As part of the cleanup effort following the 2018 Camp Fire, Paradise Irrigation District began sampling water entering the Distribution system and then working our way systematically out into our system, eventually reaching every service line serving all the standing structures in the Town: PID will soon complete sampling all mains to the damaged lots. Fire damage caused a potential for pipes to be contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as Benzene and others. High VOCs concentrations in water can cause acute reactions to skin and may even let off fumes into the air causing nausea and dizziness. VOCs are known carcinogens; even low levels of VOCs are dangerous over time. State and federal agencies have developed standards related to VOCs to protect our health and safety.

The results shown below are related to this massive sampling effort undertaken by the district. In order for a parcel (standing structure or new construction) to receive a clearance letter from PID, the service line to that parcel has been tested and verified to meet all state standards or it has been replaced with a new line. Additionally, all the main lines from that parcel tracing all the way back to the treatment plant must have been cleared. For a main line to be cleared it must have been sampled and shown to be non-detect( ND) for benzene and meet all state standards for VOCs (ND for benzene is stricter than state standards). Mains that did not meet these requirements were either thoroughly flushed and retested until clear or replaced. Currently all the flow-through mains in the Town of Paradise have been cleared; PID crews are working to clear the deadend mains which remain.

FIRE-RELATED SAMPLING OF NON-POTABLE WATER

Constituents Sample in 2019  MCL NL

Total Number
of Detections

Average
Detection (ppb)
Lowest
Detection (ppb)
Highest
Detection (ppb)
 Benzene  1.0 -- 273 20.3 0.5 923.0
 Bromodichloromethane 80.0 -- 3588 2.6 0.5 12.0
 Bromoform 80.0 -- 2 0.5 0.5 0.5
 tert-Butanol (TBA) -- 12.0 19 59.7 4.4 600.0
 n-Butylbenzene -- 260.0 6 0.7 0.5 0.8
 sec-Butylbenzene -- 260.0 2 0.7 0.5 0.8
 tert-Butylbenzene -- 260.0 1 1 1.0 1.0
Carbon Disulfide -- 160.00 70 2.3 0.5 0.7
Carbon Tetrachloride 0.5 -- 1 0.7 0.7 0.7
Chlorobenzene 70.0 -- 11 1.9 0.5 5.0
Chlorodibromomethane 80.0 -- 90 0.7 0.5 1.6
Chloroform 80.0 11 3792 31 0.7 200.0
2-Chlorotoluene -- 140.0 1 0.7 0.7 0.7
4-Chlorotoluene -- 140.0 3 1.5 1.0 1.8
Dibromo-3-chloropropane 0.2 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
1,2-Dibromoethane 0.1 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
1,2-Dichlorobenzene 600.0 -- 1 0.5 0.5 0.5
1,4-Dichlorobenzene 5.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
Dichlorodifluoromethane (freon 12) -- 1000.0 0 0 0.0 0.0
1,1-Dichloroethane 5.0 -- 38 1.3 0.5 4.0
1,2-Dichloroethane 0.5 -- 3 2.6 2.1 3.0
1,1-Dichloroethene 6.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
cis-1,2-Dichloroethene 6.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene 10.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
1,2-Dichloropropane 5.0 -- 1 0.6 0.6 0.6
1,3-Dichloropropene (Total) 0.5 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
cis-1,2-Dichloropropene 0.5 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
trans-1,3-Dichloropropene 0.5 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
Ethylbenzene 300.0 -- 157 9.2 0.5 730.0
Isopropylbenzene -- 770.0 69 2.9 0.5 34.0
Methyl-t-butyl Ether (MTBE) 13.0 -- 2 1.4 0.7 2.2
Methylene chloride 5.0 -- 342 5.8 0.5 34.0
4-Methyl-2-pentanone -- 120.0 1 11 11.0 11.0
Naphthalene -- 17.0 114 9.1 0.5 278.0
N-propylbenzene -- 260.0 15 1.6 0.5 3.9
Styrene 100.0 -- 90 107.3 0.5 6800.0
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane 1.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) 5.0 -- 3 1.3 0.6 2.8
Toluene 150.0 -- 189 16.4 0.5 1400.00
1,2,4-Tichlorobenzene 5.0 -- 3 1.8 0.5 2.4
1,1,1-Trichloroethane 200.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
1,1,2-Trichloroethane 5.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
Trichloroethene (TCE) 5.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
Trichlorofluoromethane (Freon 11) 150.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
1,2,3-Trichloropropane 0.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
1,1,2-Trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113) 1200.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene -- 330.0 28 1.5 0.5 3.9
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene -- 330.0 11 1.9 0.6 8.8
Vinyl Chloride 0.5 -- 6 0.7 0.6 0.8
m-Xylene 1750.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
p-Xylene 1750.0 -- 0 0 0.0 0.0
m and p Xylene 1750.0 -- 288 2.8 0.5 162.0
o-Xylene 1750.0 -- 226 2.6 0.5 50.0
Xylenes (Total) 1750.0 -- 349 4.1 0.5 175.0
Total Trihalomethanes 80.0 -- 3793 33.4 0.7 200.0
TOTAL VOC SAMPLES TAKEN IN 2019 4,469          
TOTAL NUMBER OF VOC SPECIES
TESTED FOR IN 2019
262,205          

 

This Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) reflects changes in drinking water regulatory requirements during 2019. All water systems are required to comply with the state Total Coliform Rule. Beginning April 1, 2016, all water systems were also required to comply with the federal Revised Total Coliform Rule. The new federal rule maintains the purpose to protect public health by ensuring the integrity of the drinking water distribution system and monitoring for the presence of microbials (e.g., total coliform and E. coli bacteria). The U.S. EPA anticipates greater public health protection as the new rule requires water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems. Water systems that exceed a specified frequency of total coliform occurrences are required to conduct an assessment to determine if any sanitary defects exist. If found, these must be corrected by the water system.

 

 

 

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